Fold-away bed enlarges this well-crafted van conversion (Video)

Van conversions are intriguing studies in small-space design. But even with the most careful of configurations, one often finds that the bed is the item that takes up the most space. Some may loft it up to make some storage space underneath, but this still gobbles up valuable floor space.

Seattle, Washington woodworker Ryan Dawell of Rydawell Woodworks converted this high-roofed Dodge Promaster into a portable home that he can take with him on work-related trips, building things for clients. Dawell takes a familiar but fresh approach to the problem of the space-hogging bed: he makes a fold-away Murphy out of it. Watch this tour via Alternative Homes Today (seen here previously and offering a van conversion course that Dawell took a couple of years ago):

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Rydawell Woodworks© Rydawell Woodworks

This is one of the most meticulously crafted van conversions we’ve seen thus far, utilizing some mad skills and high-quality wood materials (some of it offcuts salvaged from Dawell’s woodshop).

Rydawell Woodworks© Rydawell Woodworks
Rydawell Woodworks© Rydawell Woodworks

The van has two zones situated on either side. To one side sits the fold-down bed, held in place with pins, and when deployed, uses a couple of feet that screw in to support it. The kitchen with its distinctive, striped butcher block counter, made with offcuts, and curly maple cabinets, is also situated on this side. There’s a small propane stove here and sink connected to a 5-gallon water tank underneath. No space is wasted: there is a toe-kick drawer and more foot-level storage on this side.

Rydawell Woodworks© Rydawell Woodworks
Rydawell Woodworks© Rydawell Woodworks

On the other side sits the big storage wall that hides a fold-up table and two seats, plus a lot of cubbies for holding personal belongings. Behind this wall of storage cubbies is where the wiring for the solar system runs, leading to a hidden battery and control panel that’s conveniently located on the side.

Rydawell Woodworks© Rydawell Woodworks
Rydawell Woodworks© Rydawell Woodworks
Rydawell Woodworks© Rydawell Woodworks

The van (financed as Dawell’s business vehicle for his company) plus renovation costs brings the cost of this project to around USD $40,000. Thanks to its hidden bed, the van’s interior feels extremely spacious, leaving a lot more room for Dawell to carry equipment, materials or what-have-you. Very well done. To see more, or find out more about Ryan Dawell’s woodworking or vehicle conversion services, visit his website.

Family’s home is two tiny houses connected with a central sun room & deck

Many have pointed out that tiny houses aren’t for everyone: families with kids might come to mind, for example, though we have seen more than a few instances of average-sized families adjusting to the tiny life, whether on wheels or otherwise.

There’s also the possibility of just using two tiny houses together, as tiny house builder Viva Collectiv has done with The Ohana. It’s basically two tiny homes connected in the middle by an open sun room and deck (and was apparently featured on Tiny House Nation).

According to commenters over at Tiny House Talk, this compound of two tinys is home to a family with kids. As you can see from the photos, it appears that the parents’ bedroom, kitchen and bathroom is situated in one tiny house. The hallway here that goes around the bathroom makes the space seem small, though, and it might have made more sense to switch the placement of the bathroom and kitchen in the interest of keeping the common areas opening out onto the sheltered outdoor space.

Viva Collectiv© Viva Collectiv
Viva Collectiv© Viva Collectiv
Viva Collectiv© Viva Collectiv
Viva Collectiv© Viva Collectiv

This is a gorgeous bathroom with impressive tiling!

Viva Collectiv© Viva Collectiv

The sun room and deck in the middle is a clever idea, extending the useable space between the two buildings, and connecting them spatially. It’s too bad that it’s not screened off, though — depending on the location, bugs and cold weather may limit its use year-round. But it’s nevertheless a plausible solution to the “too-tiny” problem.

Viva Collectiv© Viva Collectiv

Meanwhile, on the other side, the kids have a sleeping loft upstairs in the other tiny house (not pictured, unfortunately). This secondary tiny structure is where the family has their sitting room as well, in addition to the kids’ playroom.

Viva Collectiv© Viva Collectiv
Viva Collectiv© Viva Collectiv
Viva Collectiv© Viva Collectiv

Living on a tiny footprint may seem extreme and radical to many. But at probably around 400 square feet, this home could be considered ‘small’ rather than ‘tiny’, and as some have pointed out, countering the negative environmental and social impacts of the “bigger is better” myth may require the radical approach that the tiny house movement advocates. In the end, it may be about finding that middle ground, where more sustainable housing is of a small rather than tiny size, where the big revolution happens. More at Viva Collectiv.

How small can an apartment be and still be habitable?

How small is too small?

We show a lot of tiny houses on TreeHugger, and recently showed some tiny apartments for rent in London, part of the co-living trend. Commenters were not impressed, thinking it barely acceptable for temporary living.

But in Sao Paulo, Brazil, a developer is selling 10 square meter (107 SF) apartments with everything you need (except room to swing a cat) built in. Being a condo, it is definitely more of a long-term thing.

base of building© Vitacon

A few years back TreeHugger founder Graham Hill’s consultancy LifeEdited was talking to the developer, VITACON, and while this is a different building, it certainly has some LifeEdited touches in the common facilities.

tool library© Vitacon

Beside the gym, big kitchen for entertaining, and laundromat, there is the trademark tool library…

co-working space© Vitacon

… and, of course, a co-working space, although I would be sure to have my back to that giant clock.

the gym© Vitacon

The market for small units is growing; according to Raquel Rolnik , translated for ArchDaily,

There is no doubt that this type of real estate is related to newest trends of family compositions. It is increasingly common for residences to be occupied by only one person, or at most two. According to data from the SEADE Foundation for 2010, in the state of São Paulo, almost 40% of households have these characteristic, 13% of which is made up of a single resident. Therefore, apartment buildings as small as the one that has just been released are not targeted to large families, but couples without children, emancipated young people, divorced people, or even the elderly in an increasingly aging population.

This is indeed a growing market in North America as well, with a larger proportion of the population living alone. But how much space does a single person need, and how much can they get away with?

plan of very tiny unit© Vitacon

The New Hygienopolis (what a name!) has a range of unit sizes, but the 100m2 one is the most interesting. Like the units in the collective in London, it seems to be dominated by the bathroom; I wonder why they can’t learn from boats and RVs and just turn the whole toilet and sink area into a shower too.

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I love the video, with the invisible resident going through the activities of the day. There is clever storage under the wood floor section, a decent amount of clothing storage and a workable kitchen, all in a very small space.

At some point, you have to wonder if this really makes sense. The developer is already paying for the kitchen, bathroom and common areas, so how much would it really cost to put in a few more inches of space? Is there a minimum floor area that even single people need to live in? If you subtract the kitchen and bath, this apartment’s living space is no bigger than the bed itself.

kitchen in condo© Vitacon

The theoretical key to making this all work is the communal stuff, the gym and the co-working space, and at least they can go hang out in what looks to be a terrible communal kitchen, with the stove on the island like that. No wonder the people don’t look very happy.

Could you live in this?

Could you live in 107 square feet?

Could co-living help solve our urban housing crisis?

Housing is really expensive in our successful cities, and young people in particular are finding it difficult to find or afford a place to live near where they work. That’s why co-living projects are popping up in cities like Los Angeles and Amsterdam. Now one of the biggest co-living experiments anywhere has opened in London – The Collective at Old Oak.

room interior© The Collective

The tiny rooms start at £178 per week (US $236 or the equivalent in bitcoin), and every one of them has a tiny bathroom which still takes up a lot of space. But that’s what separates it from a college dorm – nobody really likes sharing bathrooms.

suite plan© The Collective

Some have shared tiny kitchenettes; others have private ones. But the real deal is the stuff that is shared, the stuff outside the rooms. As the Economist describes it:

collective theater© Collective

MONDAY is “Game of Thrones” night at The Collective’s Old Oak building. Millennials congregate in TV rooms around the 11-storey, 550-person block. Some gather at the cinema, lounging on bean bags decorated with old graphics from Life magazine.

A resident explains that she moved in because she wanted to be around people but not seek out roommates.

“I would call it a hipster commune, not a hippy commune,” she says. She particularly likes meeting friends walking home from the train station but says kitchen utensils often go missing. (With too many co-livers to be able to know everyone personally, CCTV is used in these areas as a guarantor of good conduct and cleanliness.)

library© The Collective/ Library

There are quiet library-like rooms for work, dining rooms, big kitchens that residents can cook big meals in, the afore-mentioned cinema and of course, a laundromat, which the the Economist writer notes is the liveliest area in the building, “where residents mingle and watch TV as they wait for washing cycles.”

Laundry© The Collective/ Laundromat

A writer for Glamour magazine, who tried the place out, also liked the laundry, noting that “thanks to the addition of disco balls it’s the place to be at The Collective.” She talks to one resident who says he is there because “ this is an ecologically and ideologically sound environment.”

And indeed, it does hit some TreeHugger buttons, being small spaces in an urban environment close to transit, with lots of shared spaces and even a tool library.

lobby© The Collective

The Collective is 97 percent full, and the developer is building two more projects in London and is going to expand to Boston, New York and Berlin. He’s learned that the rooms should be a little bit bigger (that’s the main reason people say they are moving on) and The kitchens will all be in one place instead of being spread around the building (too much silverware apparently goes missing).

One property expert sees co-living evolving into a range of spaces for different stages of lives.

[Roger Southam of Savills] sees much more potential if co-living spaces can give residents slightly more private space, allowing them to attract people already living in cities. Starting from the smallest of rooms and working up may let co-living firms hit upon the perfect balance of shared and private space. Who, after all, doesn’t want a cinema in the basement?

kitchen© The Collective

There is a lot to love about this idea. One size doesn’t fit all and peoples’ needs change throughout their lives. And it shouldn’t just be for young people starting out; 27 percent of Americans now live alone, mostly younger and older people. Co-living might be a great solution for people of all ages.

Spot the retractable stair in this brilliant tiny house (Video)

We once famously complained that tiny houses were too cutesy and derivative. But since then, we’ve seen a real evolution of this particular type of small home on wheels, and examples of every style you can imagine, from ultra-modern to quirky and experimental.

New Zealand’s Build Tiny created this lovely modern gem, not-so-subtly called the Millennial Tiny House (they have another model called the Boomer). From the outside, it looks like your typical shed-style roof kind of tiny house, but inside, it’s chock full of clever storage, seating and stair ideas. Check this impressive powerhouse of a tiny out:

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Build Tiny© Build Tiny

We love this retractable, welded aluminium stair that interleaves itself into a bank of storage drawers, seen on both the ‘great room’ and the bathroom side. It’s an idea we’ve seen before, but this appears to be the first time we’ve seen it in a tiny house. This clever stair also eliminates the need for a ladder going up to the sleeping loft (making it great for less-agile boomers too).

Build Tiny© Build Tiny
Build Tiny© Build Tiny
Build Tiny© Build Tiny

The main ‘great room’ also has smart under-floor storage cabinets, and has a very Zen-like feel to it. Two sets of double patio doors face each other, permitting natural cross-ventilation and a strong connection between indoors and outdoors.

Build Tiny© Build Tiny
Build Tiny© Build Tiny
Build Tiny© Build Tiny

The kitchen also has plenty of places to store food and utensils, and part of the counter forms the step up to the ladder leading up to the workspace and guest sleeping loft.

Build Tiny© Build Tiny
Build Tiny© Build Tiny

Check out how the seating ledge for the workspace overlaps with the kitchen below: genius.

Build Tiny© Build Tiny
Build Tiny© Build Tiny
Build Tiny© Build Tiny
Build Tiny© Build Tiny

The bathroom is also well-designed, with enough space integrated for a washer-dryer combination machine, place to store linens, a shower and a composting toilet on castors, allowing it to be wheeled out of the way when not in use.

Build Tiny© Build Tiny
Build Tiny© Build Tiny

This is definitely one of our favourite tiny houses; lots of clever space-saving solutions and offered in a modern package that feels open and bright. Pricing for just the shell begins at NZD $59,750 (USD $43,378), and a full build rings in at NZD $120,500 (USD $87,483). For more information, visit Build Tiny.

12 dreamy treehouses for living in the trees

Although they have their playful moments, these gorgeously designed tiny homes in the boughs prove that treehouses have a grown-up side as well.

It’s hard to resist the appeal of a treehouse. From childhood retreat to grown-up getaway, there’s something inherently lovely about getting up off the ground and into the trees. Who wouldn’t want to escape it all to be surrounded by our noble arboreal neighbors, nestled in rustling leaves and birdsong? There’s definitely a “treehouse culture” that is growing across the globe, as evidenced by the beautiful treehouse projects that have been sprouting up all over the place. The ones on the following pages are some of our favorites. They range from rustic to elegant, but all beautifully designed. And more often than not, include a playful element – slides, a trampoline bed, even a skate park! – that hint at the magic and wonder to be found in a home housed in trees.

1. Nasu Tea Treehouse
The Nasu Tea Treehouse, pictured above, is one of the beauties created by self-taught Japanese treehouse builder Takashi Kobayashi. As Kimberly writes, “Kobayashi sees the future of a sustainable culture as one that lives with trees…” Author of the 2008 book, Treedom, Kobayashi has built more than 120 treehouses, often using salvaged materials found at the building sites. “Along with Kobayashi’s innovative design philosophy,” Kimberly explains, “his treehouses are meant to also focus on raising awareness about the decline of forest stewardship, especially in Japan.” See more of his marvelous work here: The Zen of treehouses: Japan’s treehouse master Takashi Kobayashi.

Next: The Mirrorcube >>

Two online entrepreneurs travel & work from off-grid van conversion (Video)

Travelling and following your passions are things that most people yearn to do. Yet, in the midst of holding down a 9-to-5 job, in order to pay down a mortgage or monthly rent, people can find themselves caught in a vicious cycle of working just to live, rather than really living. Thankfully, it seems that technology is the big disruptor here. The Internet allows a growing number of people to work from home, or to travel and work full-time, and combined with the huge interest in minimalism and tiny living, we’re now seeing more and more people converting vehicles into homes that they can take wherever they go.

Business coaches and yoga instructors Sara and Alex James of 40 Hours of Freedom are yet another couple who decided that the the conventional lifestyle of living and working in one place was not for them. Their love for travel, hiking and other outdoor activities recently led them to convert a 2008 Dodge Sprinter into a portable, 100-percent solar-powered home, complete with a shower-equipped bathroom. It’s now their travelling office too, as they work on their digital marketing business, coaching people on how to start their own online business so that they can also escape their office jobs. As Alex tells us:

Vanlife presented the perfect opportunity to take our home with us everywhere we wanted to go. The professional landscape has changed thanks to the Internet, so we have taken that motivation to create an online business that allows us to travel and work from anywhere.

The van’s interior is nicely designed and executed, with lots of windows to let in natural light. Watch their tour:

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40 Hours Of Freedom© 40 Hours Of Freedom
40 Hours Of Freedom© 40 Hours Of Freedom

There’s a lot to like about this van: first, it has a bathroom space that combines a shower with a toilet. There is a self-cleaning shower door that slides open and closed, and wipes itself dry at the same time, eliminating those moldy shower curtain smells. In the same area, just behind the driver’s seat, there’s a kennel for the couple’s two small dogs, and a small closet space.

40 Hours Of Freedom© 40 Hours Of Freedom

The couple love to cook their own healthy vegan meals, so the van’s kitchen area features a big counter space, a small refrigerator and overhead storage cabinets, which are equipped with pneumatic hinges to help them open on their own.

40 Hours Of Freedom© 40 Hours Of Freedom
40 Hours Of Freedom© 40 Hours Of Freedom

The kitchen sink is actually a bathroom sink that’s been adapted for its size — it’s not as small as a typical RV sink, but not too large for the van and still allows them to wash pans and dishes. Across from the main kitchen counter is yet another counter space, resting on top of drawers for clothing.

40 Hours Of Freedom© 40 Hours Of Freedom

At the back of the van is the dining table, which conveniently can be slightly rotated to allow one to get in and out easily. It’s an RV-style table, where you use it as a table during the day, but at night, the supports underneath can be removed, and the table surface placed at the same level as the seating, forming a bed.

40 Hours Of Freedom© 40 Hours Of Freedom
40 Hours Of Freedom© 40 Hours Of Freedom
40 Hours Of Freedom© 40 Hours Of Freedom

The couple bought their van for USD $25,000 with about 50,000 miles on it. The renovations cost about $10,000 and a few months to complete, with the help of Sara’s father, a professional home builder. They chose this particular type of van due to its reliability (apparently, they can run up to 300,000 miles and more), good resale value and the fact that they can stand up inside, install a bathroom, and also have plenty of storage.

40 Hours Of Freedom© 40 Hours Of Freedom

So far, the couple has explored over a dozen American states and five Canadian provinces in the last few months. They plan their travels around sites they want to visit, attending family gatherings and weddings, as well as caravanning with other folks in the broader vanlife community.

The couple says that their new living arrangements has compelled them to be very careful of how much water they use and how much waste they generate: “Your habits begin to change for the better.” Even their relationship and general outlook has changed, they say:

Life on the road has been even better than we could have imagined. There can be challenges and frustrating moments. We got stuck in the mud at a campsite in Canada late one night, but what is important is the attitude you have. Plans and the weather can change quickly and often. Being able to adapt and be flexible is crucial. Living in a small space can present it’s own challenges as well. However I think it has brought us closer together as a couple. Even if we get into a fight we move past it quickly, there’s no time or space for sulking in a van.

To find out more details and specs about Alex and Sara James’ van build or their coaching services, visit 40 Hours of Freedom.

12 buses converted into fabulous tiny homes on wheels

These modern takes on the mobile home are fresh, fun, and comfortably livable.

It used to be that the picture of the American dream included 2.5 children, a car to impress the neighbors and a tidy home, the bigger the better, with a white picket fence.

Fast forward to 2017 and cue the “record scratch” sound effect. Welcome to the new dream homes.

While Norman Rockwell towns and big houses will likely always have some appeal, we’re seeing more and more minimalist apartments and tiny homes, adaptively reused spaces and even treehouses! And for those who aren’t rooted to a single location, converted vans and buses decked out as beautifully functional roaming homes. Lured by the idea of escaping the mortgage miasma and rent rut, a new generation of nomads is proving that a life fueled by wanderlust doesn’t require a trust fund. It seems that the American dream is getting a bit of a makeover – as you can see for yourself on the following pages featuring some of our favorite converted buses.

First up, the magical cottage pictured above.

Family converts bus into beautiful cottage on wheels

If somehow a storybook cottage and a school bus fell in love and had a child, it would certainly look just like this! The lucky inhabitants are a young family of three in Key Peninsula, Washington. “With a lot of imagination, design savvy and skillful craftsmanship, they’ve managed to transform this vehicle into a whimsical, modern cottage on wheels,” writes Kimberly. See it all here: Family converts school bus into beautiful cottage on wheels

Next: Old school bus converted into loft is traveling from Alaska to South America >>

Jewel of a tiny house comes with extra porch & balcony (Video)

For many, the idea of downsizing from a conventionally sized house down to a much smaller house seems like an extreme move to take. Yet, many seem to be taking that leap into the new and unknown, like Jewel Pearson, a tiny house owner living in Charlotte, North Carolina. Pearson took a gradual approach to transitioning from the conventional lifestyle over to tiny living, moving first out of her four-bedroom home into a one-bedroom apartment, and then finally into a 360-square-foot custom-built tiny home sprinkled with lots of great small-space design ideas. Pearson’s story was shared on an HGTV show a couple of years back, but you can watch this interview done by Tiny House Expedition for free:

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My Gypsy Soul© My Gypsy Soul

Pearson’s 28-foot-long home is an elegant gem that has everything that makes her feel content. She wanted a place with lots of windows, where she could watch sunrise and sunsets, as well as a 4-foot-long screened-in porch and a balcony above that porch where she could enjoy nice weather without too much fuss.

There’s a lot to like about this house: the massive windows flood the space with natural sunlight, making it feel enormous. The regular-sized couch looks quite comfortable, and has a removable wooden surface on the ottoman portion to allow it to be used as a coffee table.

My Gypsy Soul© My Gypsy Soul
My Gypsy Soul© My Gypsy Soul
My Gypsy Soul© My Gypsy Soul

The kitchen is situated off to one side, and is equipped with a two-burner stove and a convection microwave. Also in this area is a huge closet, accessible via a sliding door with a lovely graphic on it. We often hear how tiny houses “lack” storage, but it seems that it depends on the person and the design: here, we see that Pearson made sure to incorporate plenty of storage from the get-go.

My Gypsy Soul© My Gypsy Soul
My Gypsy Soul© My Gypsy Soul
My Gypsy Soul© My Gypsy Soul
My Gypsy Soul© My Gypsy Soul

Here are views of the reading nook beside the closet, and the enclosed porch. This is a smart addition, as it expands the usable space, both on the ground level and up above with the small balcony that’s been added on top of the porch structure.

My Gypsy Soul© My Gypsy Soul
My Gypsy Soul© My Gypsy Soul
My Gypsy Soul© My Gypsy Soul

At the other end lies the bathroom, closed off by a sliding door with a convenient full-length mirror. There’s a combination Splendide washer-dryer here, and we like how the bathroom counter has been designed to incorporate it underneath.

My Gypsy Soul© My Gypsy Soul

Here’s a view of the reading nook above the bathroom, reachable by a series of pipe-styled rungs above the couch.

My Gypsy Soul© My Gypsy Soul
My Gypsy Soul© My Gypsy Soul

The stairs going up to the bedroom loft is nicely done — here we see that a rare appearance of the tiny house handrail (a reminder that safety is important when designing a tiny home)!

My Gypsy Soul© My Gypsy Soul

Pearson’s home was designed by her, in collaboration with her sister and friend, both interior designers. As Pearson tells Little Things, it was a gradual but ultimately freeing process getting down to her own personal essentials:

I live tiny, but I’m not a minimalist, so I haven’t gotten rid of everything. Over the course of getting to a one bedroom apartment, I either gave away or sold furniture and clothing to pair down to the items I didn’t want to get rid of. I’ve kept the things that are part of who I am.

It wasn’t an overnight process, as Pearson intentionally started downsizing back in 2005, when she decided to nudge herself toward a lifestyle that would allow her to travel more, and to live with less financial obligations. It’s something she knew she wanted to do since her now-grown daughter was in kindergarten. Pearson’s funny story is that she made an agreement with her then young daughter that if the little girl “made it big,” she would buy her mother an RV. Pearson quips jokingly that: “My daughter graduated from Harvard Law and is an attorney so she technically still owes me.”

Pearson had initially considered purchasing an RV, but after doing the math, realized that it would be quite expensive to buy and maintain. After finding out about tiny houses, something about them clicked with Pearson. She’s since gotten involved in the tiny house community, as well as offering tours and consultations with people interested in tiny living, in addition to launching Tiny House Trailblazers, a website that highlights stories about people of colour who are living tiny.

Pearson’s story is an inspiring one, showing that you don’t necessarily have to give up all your possessions and creature comforts to live in a smaller home — it’s a matter of balancing your dreams with what you think you need to do or to let go to achieve your ideal of freedom. It’s a process, and it can be done at your own pace, and it can be done with satisfying results. If you’re interested in building something similar, you can find plans via My Gypsy Soul and Facebook.

[Via: Tiny House Talk]

Prismatic stained glass cabin is a lakeside refuge from the city

Cabins are thought of as places to escape the humdrum of daily life in the popular imagination. Not surprisingly, they can be imaginative structures themselves, ranging from the rustic constructions to modern beauties. In France, visual artist Lou Andréa Lassalle created this extraordinary cabin on the shores of a lake near Bordeaux, establishing an inviting spot for city dwellers to come and enjoy the natural delights of this region.

Built as part of the Refuges Périurbains, which offers overnight stays in a series of these temporary installations scattered all around the city’s periphery, Lassalle’s Prism cabin is envisioned as an eyepiece that refracts the unseen subtleties of the landscape. The idea of this prism-like function is enhanced with the structure’s gorgeous stained glass windows.

Lou Andréa Lassalle© Lou Andréa Lassalle
Lou Andréa Lassalle© Lou Andréa Lassalle

Lassalle explains:

The Prism is a place between two dimensions. One between oneself in which one retires, conducive to revelations. A new omen, a place to live alone or with a group with whom to remake the world. Between the glass facets of this new refuge, the lights and the world diffract to reveal unsuspected nuances. We rediscover the landscape, its different specters invisible to the naked eye. A horizon full of phantasmagoric visions, waiting for its revelation. Under the prism of this new refuge, an entire universe has to be reinvented, in this intimate and silent place, floating between the real and the dream.

Lou Andréa Lassalle© Lou Andréa Lassalle
Lou Andréa Lassalle© Lou Andréa Lassalle

The Prism stands at the edge of La Blanche lake in Ambares-et-Lagrave. According to Lassalle, its enigmatic form, bookended by two Sphinx-like references, “concentrates all the positive energies of La Blanche,” and “evokes the esotericism of the waterbank where local fish, monsters from the depths, high voltage towers and natural fog mix.”

Lou Andréa Lassalle© Lou Andréa Lassalle

That microcosmic vision of mythical nature interwoven with the man-made meshes well with the macrocosmic vision of these peri-urban refuges as a whole: as Wikipedia defines it, “peri-urbanization relates to those processes of dispersive urban growth that creates hybrid landscapes of fragmented urban and rural characteristics.” In these so-called “rurban” spaces, urban and rural uses of land are inter-mixed, and right here, on the edge of the lake, with the temporary human occupation of this otherwise natural spot on the shore, we have the same thing happening but on a smaller scale.

Lou Andréa Lassalle© Lou Andréa Lassalle
Lou Andréa Lassalle© Lou Andréa Lassalle
Lou Andréa Lassalle© Lou Andréa Lassalle

While the cabin doesn’t have plumbing or electricity, it features a outdoor deck and a dry composting toilet, and enough space inside to host up to eight people. It’s basic, but pre-reservations are free for one night, and the idea is to get people out of the city and back into nature, if only for a short while. For more information, visit Refuges Périurbains and Lou Andréa Lassalle.

[Via: Faith Is Torment]